An adventure of my life time!

Posts tagged ‘ching’

440. My book is featured in Xin Hua Net, the biggest news agency in China!

Feature: Chinese-American writer inspired by true story of “Flying Tiger” saved in China

 

Source: Xinhua    2018-07-15 05:20:56

NEW YORK, July 14 (Xinhua) — “World War Two… China… One cousin’s courage, another’s determination to help a wounded American pilot.” Chinese-American writer Iris Yang’s heartwrenching story is now a hot sale in the United States.

Fresh from the print in June, Yang’s English novel, Wings of a Flying Tiger, has been well received by readers and book reviewers.

“It is a heroic tale in which ordinary Chinese risked their lives to rescue and safeguard a downed American pilot in WWII in China,” said Yang, adding that she based the book on true experience of Tex Hill, the “Flying Tigers” member who was rescued by Chinese villagers.

The “Flying Tigers,” or the American Volunteer Group (AVG), was a band of about 300 pilots and ground staff who volunteered to help China fight invading Japanese troops before the United States officially entered WWII.

SAVING FLYING TIGER

The novel is framed in the summer of 1942, when Danny Hardy bails out of his fighter plane into a remote region of western China. With multiple injuries, malaria, and Japanese troops searching for him, the American pilot’s odds of survival are slim.

Jasmine Bai, an art student who had been saved by Americans during the Nanking Massacre, seems an unlikely heroine to rescue the wounded Flying Tiger. Daisy Bai, Jasmine’s younger cousin, also falls in love with the courageous American.

With the help of Daisy’s brother, an entire village opens its arms to heal the Flying Tiger with injured wings, but as a result of their charity the serenity of their community is forever shattered.

“I like fiction writing, especially historical fiction. It allows me to create characters in a historical setting. I enjoy the process – learning the history and producing likable or hateful characters,” Yang was quoted by BookGlow, the leading website on book promotion, as saying recently after the book debuted in June.

It took her three months full time to finish the first draft, but two more years to rewrite again and again until the book was published.

“My heart sank just a little deeper with every passing scene. At times the anguish was almost unbearable. It was all I could do to keep my composure to the chilling end. I recommend this heartfelt read with no hesitation to any admirer of historical fiction,” said Paul Falk in his review of the book on BookGlow.

WRITE WITH BURNING DESIRE

Yang was born and raised in Wuhan, capital city of China’s middle province Hubei, relocated to America in the 1980s for study, and settled down in North Carolina.

With a PhD in biology, Yang still cherishes a dream of literary writing, which has inspired her to complete her first novel and survive various difficulties and setbacks in life.

“The process of writing has changed my life and made me better all the way through,” Yang was quoted by major Mandarin newspaper The China Press as saying.

Her grandmother studied in the United Kingdom and later became one of the most respected translators in China. This was the family gene that drove Yang to blossom on the dual tracks of science and literature.

“Writing is hard. If you don’t have a burning desire, don’t do it. But if you are passionate about it, don’t let anything or anyone stop you,” said Yang on BookGlow.

The 254-page fiction published by Open Books has won a five-star Average Customer Review on Amazon.

A sequel named Will of a Flying Tiger will be published at the end of this year.

“I’m working on a story based on my grandmother. My grandma’s life was a mix of triumphs and tragedies. I’ll try my best to write it down,” said Yang.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-07/15/c_137324391.htm

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439. My book is featured in China Daily News

NEW YORK – “World War Two… China… One cousin’s courage, another’s determination to help a wounded American pilot.” Chinese-American writer Iris Yang’s heartwrenching story is now a hot sale in the United States.

Fresh from the print in June, Yang’s English novel, Wings of a Flying Tiger, has been well received by readers and book reviewers.

“It is a heroic tale in which ordinary Chinese risked their lives to rescue and safeguard a downed American pilot in WWII in China,” said Yang, adding that she based the book on true experience of Tex Hill, the “Flying Tigers” member who was rescued by Chinese villagers.

The “Flying Tigers,” or the American Volunteer Group (AVG), was a band of about 300 pilots and ground staff who volunteered to help China fight invading Japanese troops before the United States officially entered WWII.

SAVING FLYING TIGER

The novel is framed in the summer of 1942, when Danny Hardy bails out of his fighter plane into a remote region of western China. With multiple injuries, malaria, and Japanese troops searching for him, the American pilot’s odds of survival are slim.

Jasmine Bai, an art student who had been saved by Americans during the Nanking Massacre, seems an unlikely heroine to rescue the wounded Flying Tiger. Daisy Bai, Jasmine’s younger cousin, also falls in love with the courageous American.

With the help of Daisy’s brother, an entire village opens its arms to heal the Flying Tiger with injured wings, but as a result of their charity the serenity of their community is forever shattered.

“I like fiction writing, especially historical fiction. It allows me to create characters in a historical setting. I enjoy the process – learning the history and producing likable or hateful characters,” Yang was quoted by BookGlow, the leading website on book promotion, as saying recently after the book debuted in June.

It took her three months full time to finish the first draft, but two more years to rewrite again and again until the book was published.

“My heart sank just a little deeper with every passing scene. At times the anguish was almost unbearable. It was all I could do to keep my composure to the chilling end. I recommend this heartfelt read with no hesitation to any admirer of historical fiction,” said Paul Falk in his review of the book on BookGlow.

WRITE WITH BURNING DESIRE

Yang was born and raised in Wuhan, capital city of China’s middle province Hubei, relocated to America in the 1980s for study, and settled down in North Carolina.

With a PhD in biology, Yang still cherishes a dream of literary writing, which has inspired her to complete her first novel and survive various difficulties and setbacks in life.

“The process of writing has changed my life and made me better all the way through,” Yang was quoted by major Mandarin newspaper The China Press as saying.

Her grandmother studied in the United Kingdom and later became one of the most respected translators in China. This was the family gene that drove Yang to blossom on the dual tracks of science and literature.

“Writing is hard. If you don’t have a burning desire, don’t do it. But if you are passionate about it, don’t let anything or anyone stop you,” said Yang on BookGlow.

The 254-page fiction published by Open Books has won a five-star Average Customer Review on Amazon.

A sequel named Will of a Tiger will be published at the end of this year.

“I’m working on a story based on my grandmother. My grandma’s life was a mix of triumphs and tragedies. I’ll try my best to write it down,” said Yang.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201807/15/WS5b4a8c95a310796df4df67b7.html

438. My book is featured on The China Press Weekly (侨报周末)!

致敬飞虎队 杨青英文小说获好评

July 12, 2018, 13:17 PM

杨青的《Wings

杨青的《Wings of a Flying Tiger》获得五星好评。杨青供图

作者杨青。杨青供图

作者杨青。杨青供图

“刚刚从亚马逊得到第一份评论…。.太棒了,五星!他们称这是关于二战中国战场的历史记录,还写了大幅评论!我好激动,松了一口气,此前我一直在担心….。.”这是美籍华人作家杨青(Iris Yang)最近一条微信朋友圈的叙述。她的小说《Wings of a Flying Tiger》(《飞虎之翼》)今年6月刚刚出版,目前全美销量颇佳。

█侨报特约记者刘航7月10日北卡报道

杨青出生和成长于中国武汉,上世纪80年代初来美读书,后来在美国北卡州居住了很长时间。

“非英语母语、生物学博士、曾经胆小怕事的文艺女青年”如今看来,这些标签很难跟英文小说作家联系在一起。然而这的确是她开始写作时的真实状况。聊起自己走上文学之路的经历,杨青坦陈:“我所做的一切努力,是希望用一部小说来感谢当年帮助过我们的飞虎队,然而这个过程却改变了我的生活,使我成为了更好的自己。”

起初,和大多数在美求学后留下来的华人一样,杨青的人生轨迹因循“刻苦而成绩优异的留学生、讲台上和实验室里的好老师、别人眼中拥有幸福美满家庭的中产知识女性”的轨迹。至于英文水准,应付科研论文写作绰绰有余,距离写小说还有很大距离。

然而看似柔弱的她,却“心有猛虎,细嗅蔷薇”。她自小崇拜作家祖母早年留英并成为翻译大家的事迹,始终怀揣文学梦。在个人生活遭遇变故以后那些消沉的日子里,她偶然看到一个心理自我调整的方法:“每天在纸上写下五条积极的事情,坚持21天,消极情绪会得到改变。”她,把这件事坚持了两年。从最初用单词写下一朵花、一个微笑带来的好心情,到尝试写作短篇小说参加校园比赛,到最终尝试长篇历史小说写作并寻求出版。

谈到这本小说的创作,杨青说她的灵感源于飞虎队员特克斯·赫尔(Tex Hill) 的纪实口述:二战亚洲战场上,一位飞行员不幸坠机,万幸被中国百姓搭救。然而当他回到美国,不慎在一次采访中对公众透露了自己被中国一个小村庄的老百姓搭救的事,万万没有想到,这消息被日本间谍获悉,而在地球那端,战争仍在继续。他的无心陈诉,导致这个村庄所有人全部被报复屠杀。

据悉,今年底《Wings of a Flying Tiger》的续集《Will of a Tiger》(《飞虎之愿》)也将正式出版。在战争结束70多年后,由一位华裔作家以英文小说的形式,把南京大屠杀、重庆大轰炸,特别是中美两国曾经并肩作战的历史介绍给读者,对今时和未来的中、美来说,无疑是件好事。

本文版权属“纽约侨报”所有,转载请注明“来源:纽约侨报网”。违反上述声明者,我们将追究其相关法律责任。

437. Fight Against Injustice

My book has been published for just a month, and I’ve received overwhelming support and positive feedback from friends and strangers. Twitter is a fantastic promotional tool—I’ve sold quite a few books there (I’ve got 5000 followers in 3 months).

However, a few Japanese replied to my posts. They called me a brainwashed communist, telling me that the Nanking Massacre never happened and it was made up by the communists. Three hundred thousand Chinese were killed by the Japanese troops in six weeks during the massacre. Hundreds of photos, mostly taken by the Japanese soldiers, showed the atrocities. How can anyone deny the truth?

Please support me against such injustice. I appreciate your kindness and help!

https://www.amazon.com/Wings-Flying-Tiger-Iris-Yang/dp/194859806X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1530998255&sr=8-1&keywords=wings+of+a+flying+tiger

436. A Smashing Historical Account of China’s Chilling Bloodbath During World War 2 (5.0 out of 5 stars)

Wings of a Flying Tiger is now available on Amazon. Here’s the first review from an independent reviewer:

A Smashing Historical Account of China’s Chilling Bloodbath during World War 2 (5.0 out of 5 stars)

World War II has always been heralded as one of my favorite periods of historical fiction. Author Iris Yang accommodated me with her well-written narrative that cried out to the ravages that shook the war-torn country of China. Sadly, hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians were murdered at the hands of the invading Japanese. There were two main protagonists; they were both were well-drawn. My heart sank just a little deeper with every passing scene. At times the anguish was almost unbearable. It was all I could do to keep my composure to the chilling end. I recommend this heartfelt read with no hesitation to any admirer of historical fiction.

Gunshots rang out as frightened refugees scrambled to board the last train destined to leave Nanking. It never left the depot; neither did some of the passengers. The Imperial forces of Japan had begun their deadly invasion. Anarchy ran rampant through the streets. Jasmine barely made it home to find that her hopes had been dashed; her parents had been murdered. My stomach churned.

The encroaching enemy showed no mercy. Men, women and children were mercilessly slaughtered. The blood-soaked streets were littered with bodies. Humanity had taken a backseat. Jasmine escaped the carnage of Nanking by the skin of her teeth. I felt nothing but pity for the human race.

By sheer luck, she reunited with her cousins Daisy and fighter pilot, Birch. Luckily, she found refuge with their parents, the Bai’s, for the next few years. The shelling, the needless killing, it never stopped. The endless heartaches took me on an emotional rollercoaster ride.

In Western Yunnan Province during the summer of 1942, a stricken plane billowing black smoke went into a tailspin and plummeted to the ground. A parachute could be seen floating down cradling the unconscious body of Danny Hardy. On the soft grass he lied there motionless. He was one of the American volunteer pilots who came to help in the Chinese struggle against the Japanese. He was one of the members of the renowned Flying Tigers. This tragic event had been witnessed by Jasmine and her cousin Daisy. In stunning detail Yang swept me along.

Jasmine sent her cousin on a perilous journey for help while she tended to the wounded pilot overnight. That cold night she snuggled close to him and provided warmth from her body. For the injured pilot, it was love at first sight. The feeling was mutual. I couldn’t pull my eyes away.

The following morning help had finally arrived. Unconscious, he was carried back to the village and had his serious wounds attended to by the herbalist, Dr Wang. Everyone in the small village praised the American pilot for coming to the aid of their country. He was a welcomed hero.

Word soon spread. The Japanese were intent on finding the downed American pilot at all costs. It was the village people’s duty and honor to protect him even if it meant placing their own lives at risk. The villagers hoped that their secret would be safe from the warring Japanese. Only time would tell.

Paul F. (Amazon reviewer)

435. Interview by Bookglow


Describe Wings of a Flying Tiger in one sentence.
It is a heroic tale in which ordinary Chinese risked their lives to rescue and safeguard a downed American pilot in WWII in China.

What led you to write it?
Wings of a Flying Tiger is a work of fiction. But to me, a Chinese-American, it is also personal. I was born and raised in China. My mother and grandma had lived in Nanking and escaped from the city just days before the notorious Nanking Massacre when the Japanese soldiers slaughtered 300,000 innocent Chinese and raped 20,000 women in six weeks. Both my mother’s and father’s families fled to Chungking, where Japanese frequently bombed the wartime capital. My father told me about the repulsive smell of burning flesh, and as a young child, he had nightmares about the raids for several years. A good friend’s father drowned when Japanese attacked his boat; even unable to swim, he jumped into a river to avoid being blasted. A Japanese friend sincerely apologized for the atrocities her fellow countrymen had committed. She knew a former soldier who forced naked Chinese women to march with them to bring up their morale.
China was an isolated country while I was growing up. We were told that the Americans were “devils” and the American soldiers were crude and cowardly. I didn’t read or hear anything about the Flying Tigers until I came to the US as a graduate student. I was touched once I learned the truth. And the more I read, the more I was touched. I wanted to thank the Flying Tigers. What is a better way to show my gratitude than writing a book about them?
The story of the Flying Tigers, a group of American volunteer pilots who helped China fight Japan in WWII, has been a fascinating and enduring topic for over seventy years. Most of the books, though, were nonfiction written from the perspectives of the pilots. This novel is a rescue story from the points of view of both the airman and the Chinese who saved him.
As a Chinese, I’m thankful for the Flying Tigers’ bravery and sacrifice; without their help, the course of the Chinese history might have been changed, my family might not have survived, and I might not have existed.
As a U.S. citizen, I’m honored to write a book about the American heroes. It’s a privilege. A duty.

How long did it take to write?
It took me three months (fulltime) to finish the first draft, but it took me two more years to rewrite, again and again. I have no idea how many drafts. It was an ongoing process.
In those two years, I shared the book, chapter by chapter, with three writing groups. And a retired journalist volunteered to edit my manuscript. The final version is 25% longer than the first draft. But it was exciting to write “The End,” even if it was a rough draft.

Do you prefer writing in one genre over another?
I like fiction writing, especially historical fiction. It allows me to create characters in a historical setting. I enjoy the process—learning the history and producing likable or hateful characters. I get the chance to create the people I’d like to meet in real life or love stories I long to have. I feel powerful and, at the same time, a great sense of responsibility. It’s thrilling and rewarding when all the pieces fall into place.

What book most influenced your life?
Many books influenced me at different stages of my life in different ways. If I have to pick one, it is a Chinese author, Jin Yong.
His novels belong to a genre called wuxia—martial arts and chivalry. His books have a widespread following in many Chinese-speaking countries and have been translated into many languages.
Unlike typical martial arts novels, Jin Yong places emphasis on patriotism and heroism. Many of his books are set in history when China was occupied or under the threat of occupation by foreign forces. He often includes unforgettable love stories, along with references to traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, martial arts, music, and philosophical thoughts. In his novels, historical figures intermingle with fictional characters.
I admired the heroes he created; I was deeply moved by the incredible love stories he created; I learned some Chinese history and culture from reading his books. I hope that my books will provide those wonderful feelings to my readers.

Where do you write?
I can write anywhere! I love to travel, so I learned to write wherever I go. A few times I wrote when I was waiting for my flight or on the plane. I wrote inside the smelly, cheap hostels or motels on rainy days. When ideas came during hikes, I sat down by the side of the trails and jotted down those precious thoughts on a small notebook or my cell phone. Although I’m not picky about the place, I won’t purposely go to coffee shops to write, as a lot of people like to do. Never understood the allure.

Is there any one thing that especially frustrates you about the writing process?
Grammar!
Born and raised in China, I learned English as a foreign language in school. The learning was limited and sometimes even wrong. I came to the U.S. in my early twenties as a graduate student for a career in science.
My first English “teacher” in the U.S. was TV. I didn’t even have the concept of the commercial. I thought accidentally I touched the remote control or there was something wrong with the TV when a program suddenly jumped to unrelated subjects. In China, at the time, there were two stations, broadcasting from 6pm to 10pm. There were no commercials. It took me a while to figure out what was going on.
I’ve always loved reading, but creative writing was a dangerous career in China. As famous writers, my grandmother and aunt were wrongfully accused as counter-revolutionary Rightists. I had to choose science—a safer path. Fiction writing was only a faraway dream; writing it in English was beyond my wildest dream.
I learned fiction writing by reading lots of books. When I wrote my novels, I’m sure I spent more time than most people. I had to constantly check two dictionaries—Chinese to English and English to Chinese. Even so, no matter how hard I tried, I still made grammatical mistakes. That frustrated me the most. There were plenty of times that I laughed and scolded myself for being so stubborn to embark on this journey that seemed almost impossible to succeed. Nowadays, so many people write; everyone has an advantage over me.
I wish I’d grown up speaking English. I wish I’d had proper education or training. Since I can’t change the past, I just have to work harder.

Any advice for novice writers?
You mean I’m not a novice writer anymore? J Even having two novels, I still have mixed feelings—shyness, unease, excitement, pride—when I call myself an author.
Writing is hard. If you don’t have a burning desire, don’t do it. But if you are passionate about it, don’t let anything or anyone stop you.
Start today. Keep writing! Don’t give up. Persistence. Perseverance. Patience.
I’ll share several useful Chinese proverbs with you:
“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”
“Every step leaves its print.”
“If you work hard enough, you can grind even an iron rod down to a needle.”
Looking back, I’m amazed that I finished a novel (actually three—two have been accepted for publication; one isn’t good enough to share with anyone), by writing down one word after another. If I can do it, anyone can.

What’s next?
I’m working on a story based on my grandmother. She was the first Chinese woman to receive a master’s degree in the UK. Returning to China, she became a professor and a famous writer/playwright. Her play was in production for years. However, in 1957, she was wrongfully accused as a counter-revolutionary Rightist. During Cultural Revolution, she was fired from her job and ordered to sweep streets. Later, she was kicked out of the house at the university. In 1973, she died alone in a small village. As the political atmosphere changed in China, she was once again a celebrated writer/scholar. She was called one of the most gifted female playwrights in Writing Women in Modern China: An Anthology of Women’s Literature from the Early Twentieth Century published by Columbia University Press in 1998. There is a park opened in her name in her hometown.
My grandma’s life was a mix of triumphs and tragedies. I’ll try my best to write it down.

http://www.bookglow.net/interview-with-iris-yang-author-of-wings-of-a-flying-tiger/

434. My Novel Is in the “Spotlight”

The sun is shining on me. 🙂 I’ve worked hard for years. I’ll enjoy the brief “spotlight.”

http://www.open-bks.com/

http://www.bookglow.net/5-books-about-world-war-ii-in-china/

 

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